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Status: completed

Madagascar

Fertilizer gets a starring role in Madagascar

About 80% of people in Madagascar depend on agriculture. Many farmers’ livelihoods were disrupt...

Introducing the Sustain Africa Fertilizer Monitor

As International fertilizer prices continue to drop, Sustain Africa’s original remit of ensurin...

Sustain Africa 2023-2024 programmes finalized

In 2023-2024, Sustain Africa aims to reach 530.000 farmers with 88.000 MT of fertilizer in Burkin...

Outlook: Retail fertilizer prices remain high in many countries

While International fertilizer prices continue to return to pre-crisis levels, retail fertilizer ...

Sustain Africa 2022 programmes on target, 2023 planning underway

Sustain Africa programmes are on track to reach 1.5 million farmers in five countries. Planning f...

Having a field day in Madagascar

Planting using fertilizer coordinated through the Sustain Africa programme kicked off in Madagasc...

Fertilizer gets a starring role in Madagascar

About 80% of people in Madagascar depend on agriculture. Many farmers’ livelihoods were disrupt...

Introducing the Sustain Africa Fertilizer Monitor

As International fertilizer prices continue to drop, Sustain Africa’s original remit of ensurin...

Sustain Africa 2023-2024 programmes finalized

In 2023-2024, Sustain Africa aims to reach 530.000 farmers with 88.000 MT of fertilizer in Burkin...

Outlook: Retail fertilizer prices remain high in many countries

While International fertilizer prices continue to return to pre-crisis levels, retail fertilizer ...

Sustain Africa 2022 programmes on target, 2023 planning underway

Sustain Africa programmes are on track to reach 1.5 million farmers in five countries. Planning f...

Having a field day in Madagascar

Planting using fertilizer coordinated through the Sustain Africa programme kicked off in Madagasc...

Sustain Africa's
work in Madagascar

Sustain Africa partner IRM has committed to 4,500 MT of discounted ammonium sulphate, targeting 72,500 farmers in 14,500 family and community farms with an integrated package of fertilizer, 500 MT of seeds and extension services. CELVA and AMBIA, the implementing partners, selected seven regions heavily affected by recent cyclones, disruptions in distribution channels and increased global fertilizer prices for focus through the programme: Alaotara-Mangoro, Aanalamanga, Atsinanana, Bongolava, Haute-Matsiaratra, Itasy. Vatovavy-Fitovinany. The goal is to create and strengthen downstream commercial agricultural input linkages between at least 8 large Hub wholesale distributors, their retail networks, 20 formal Cooperatives, and 500 small village-based farmer producer groups. As a fully integrated supply chain, these locally owned and managed businesses and community groups will work in concert to ensure 72,500 farmers have access to means of production that will enable them to be successful in the 2022 rice season and beyond. The programme began in November 2022 and will run until 4Q 2023.

Our progress in
Madagascar
Statistics
Fertilizer MT 000
325%
  • Actual: 13.7
  • Target: 4.5
Farmers 000
406%
  • Actual: 292.6
  • Target: 72.5

Overview of the
situation in Madagascar

Agriculture accounts for between 25 and 30% of Madagascar’s GDP, generating 30 to 40 per cent of exports. About 80% of Madagascar’s working age population depend on agriculture with rice the main food crop. The country has excellent potential for agricultural development due to rich natural resources, but is also seeing the effects of climate change. An estimated one quarter of the population (approximately 5 million people) live in zones at high risk of natural disasters. Farmer livelihoods were disrupted by a severe 2022 cyclone season, following two years of extreme drought. Since mid-January, the country has been hit by five tropical weather events. The two most severe, Cyclones Batisrai and Emnati, within 2 weeks of each other, were particularly devastating to many small farming towns and villages in the targeted regions. The crippling economic impact of having homes, farms, livestock, and communal infrastructure destroyed, has further reduced farmers’ already modest purchasing power and ability to secure quality inputs. Heavily damaged roads have increased travel time and disrupt farmers’ access to markets and extension services. The consequence is that many more smallholder farming families are now food insecure themselves leading to malnutrition, especially in pregnant and lactating women and young children.
We are in planning stages.
Country coming soon.